daniel sinker: Oh my god, don't make things for "Everyone." f

sinker:

From the New York Times, on the end of Karen Berger’s 30-year run at Vertigo Comics.

Mr. DiDio [co-publisher of DC Comics, which owns Vertigo] said it would be “myopic” to believe “that servicing a very small slice of our audience is the way to go ahead.”

“That’s not what we’re in the…

Source: sinker

In order to do some prep work and animation tests for the Dobot story that we have been working on over the past few months we decided to give the program Hype a try. It’s a program that allows you to easily drag and drop various images or elements into several layers which will stack up on the bottom left hand side of the screen. The general layout is a simplified version of the Adobe programs Flash and Photoshop, so anyone familiar with those shouldn’t have too hard of a time adjusting to this interface.

Once dropped into the program there’s a variety of options that you have at your disposal to add attributes to a specified layer. These range from movement, opacity, scale, etc. The only difficulty is that it takes about 30-60 minutes of just pure experimentation on your part in order get a better understanding of how everything works. They don’t seem to give you a very clear indication of what to do or how to do it. Though there are video tutorials available, they have a slightly different appearance than the current version of the program, so certain questions you might have about getting started might not actually be answered fully. Once you do get the hang of it however, it’s relatively simple to use.

The attached video is a demo of a very short sequence I animated, and while it does a good job presenting the general feel of the piece, there is still a slight jitter to the animation. Also, as you can probably see, there’s an awkward couple of seconds after the robot (Dobot) stops rising above the tree level where the animation seems to freeze. I know that this is the portion on my key-frame timeline that I decided to end the motions occurring in the trees, the family, and Dobot all at once, but kept the clouds scrolling for about 15 more seconds.

Since I did this on my laptop I’m not too certain if this has to do with my hardware rather than the program itself, but no matter what I tried this jolted movement persisted.

Sadly, you can’t add sound or music to the animations. At least not yet. Hopefully this is something they decide to include in a later version. The only reason I bring this up is because I specifically crafted music and sfx to be played alongside the animations for this story and ultimately couldn’t include them.

One last thing. They also include the option to preview the animation in your browser, but each time I tried it would take me to a blank screen where the various layers would pop in at random rather than flowing naturally as they are supposed to. This isn’t too big of a deal, but it would just be another nice element to flesh out in future updates in the program.

All in all I’m having a fun time using Hype and experimenting with various animations. It seems like a great tool if you want to do quick tests or studies before diving into the final animation. It’s free to try for 14 days with their trial, so I say if you’re at all interested, just go check it out for yourself.

6animation, Hype, review, programming, design, story, illustration, web design,

After great apprehension to do so, I broke and ended up buying a jumbo (12”x17”-ish) Moleskine sketchbook. The size is truly fantastic and really allows your hand and arm to move freely about the page without any worry of constraint. In order to get this bad boy started, I chose to do an illustration of The White Violin from Umbrella Academy by Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba. If you haven’t done so yet, read that comic now… like, right now.
It took me a while to get around to reading it myself actually. Since it came out in the years of my college education, I didn’t allow myself the opportunity of reading it then, although I’m sure it would’ve helped inspire me and my studies in some way, especially considering it was art school. Looking back on it, I didn’t even have good excuse; even the library next door to my house had a copy. In the end, I bought one for myself to enjoy at my own leisure in the comfort of my own home, and man did I enjoy it. So in short, I recommend everyone give it a chance, or at least check it out several times from your library so that it at least makes you feel guilty for not reading it. 
On another note:
I initially acquired this massive sketchbook in order to travel with it, but I had not anticipated its scale to that of my backpack. So I’m not quite sure how transportable it will ultimately be, but I plan on taking it for a spin with me to California this Friday for some good old life drawing exercises. If all goes well, I will return home with a more complete and hopefully intact sketchbook. Otherwise this White Violin sketch might be the one and only drawing attributed to this new sketchbook’s name (Heraldo?) that sees the light of day
Enjoy this piece at least and with fingers crossed let’s hope there’s more to come!
Logan
ZoomInfo
Camera
CanoScan LiDE 200
ISO
Aperture
Exposure
Focal Length

After great apprehension to do so, I broke and ended up buying a jumbo (12”x17”-ish) Moleskine sketchbook. The size is truly fantastic and really allows your hand and arm to move freely about the page without any worry of constraint. In order to get this bad boy started, I chose to do an illustration of The White Violin from Umbrella Academy by Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba. If you haven’t done so yet, read that comic now… like, right now.

It took me a while to get around to reading it myself actually. Since it came out in the years of my college education, I didn’t allow myself the opportunity of reading it then, although I’m sure it would’ve helped inspire me and my studies in some way, especially considering it was art school. Looking back on it, I didn’t even have good excuse; even the library next door to my house had a copy. In the end, I bought one for myself to enjoy at my own leisure in the comfort of my own home, and man did I enjoy it. So in short, I recommend everyone give it a chance, or at least check it out several times from your library so that it at least makes you feel guilty for not reading it.


On another note:

I initially acquired this massive sketchbook in order to travel with it, but I had not anticipated its scale to that of my backpack. So I’m not quite sure how transportable it will ultimately be, but I plan on taking it for a spin with me to California this Friday for some good old life drawing exercises. If all goes well, I will return home with a more complete and hopefully intact sketchbook. Otherwise this White Violin sketch might be the one and only drawing attributed to this new sketchbook’s name (Heraldo?) that sees the light of day

Enjoy this piece at least and with fingers crossed let’s hope there’s more to come!


Logan

6comics, sketchbook, drawing, sketch, Artists on Tumblr, art, Illustration, Umbrella Academy, Dark Horse Comics, Gerard Way, Gabriel Ba, travel, review,

We Want You, Engineer Folk!

image

We’re looking for a software engineer (not of the Tokyo Gore Police variety) that loves telling interactive stories and building awesome products. Most importantly we’re looking for someone who’s crazy enough to believe they can change the world.

We are Dobot! We’re building products for passionate people (including ourselves). Dobot has designed products for several YCombinator, Techcrunch, and Betaspring companies, as well as illustrated stories and posters for Archaia, Boom Studios, Treehouse Brand Stores (Bioware), Entertainment Weekly, and more. We’re currently creating our own interactive web comic, self titled “Dobot”, which could benefit greatly from your experience and craftsmanship.

We’re aiming for someone who can program in any of the following (we’re somewhat agnostic here): Ruby, Python, JavaScript, iOS would be cool too. We’re not expecting you to be fluent in all of them, but we’d love someone who can kick ass in a few. We’re currently writing our sites using node.js via docpad.org, but we’re all ears when it comes to the stack (we are designers, not developers, after all). If your front-end skills are up to steam, that’s a mega bonus.

Are you interested in joining a small design consultancy & product company? If so, hit us up! If not, how about you give us a hand and repost this to your buddies who might be interested.

Cheers!

Steven & Logan

6engineering, jobs, internet, design, comics, programming, dobot, web-design, art,

Internet Wayfinding

Mark Boulton is one my favorite designers today. In his 2009 “A Practical Guide to Designing for the Web”, he explained how he designed a encyclopedia for his thesis. He likened the problems of designing such a monstrous system of way-finding to the convoluted web structures people interact with daily. People don’t read a dictionary cover-to-cover. Instead, they’ll open the book at the center and quickly gather context to navigate from there to something very specific. The destination is in mind before they even pick up the book.

What a great comparison!

We need Shakespeare annotators!

Can you help us find some really great annotators for one or two Shakespeare plays? Our target readership is high school and college students. Check out our raw prototype at http://www.shakesy.com/macbeth/1/1/, and click on the text lines to view some annotations.

We’re looking to add explanations, definitions, character relationships and bios, as well as relative video & audio reenactments (and I’m sure there’s more). We’re also offering monetary compensation :)

If you’re not the one, it would be most gracious of you to share this to your friends you think could!

Thanks!!

6shakespeare, jobs, job, literature, theatre,

Openbay: A new way to get your automobile serviced.

We recently worked with Rob Infantino of Openbay and the extremely talented team at Dockyard to create the core product. This app lets car owners select and book competitive auto services in their area. What makes the product different (and better) than everything else out there on the inter-muck is the competitive, yet private, quote system as well as reviews and ratings. Customers can make informed decisions and receive the best value, while service providers can get the business they wouldn’t have seen otherwise. A total win, win.

image

The project required a complete branding, user-experience design, interface design, and some illustration. Dobot decided to begin the project by creating a few personas from the target audiences. One was for the vehicle owner, who we named Jean, and a second for the service provider, named Tim. We won’t give you the complete personas, out of respect for our client, but we will give you a brief overview:

  • Jean is married, a mother of two, a financial analyst at a small agency, and a soccer coach (..you might assume she rolls in a minivan).
  • Tim is a husband, a proud father of a 14-year-old boy, and a senior estimator at a small auto shop.
image

The full personas go as far as explaining their personalities, their education, their likes & dislikes, their reasons for using (and not using) Openbay, their major decision making influencers, and so on and so forth. We even created a persona for Openbay itself, which played a major role in choosing the right typography, layout, colors, and ultimately the logo.

image

For now, only drivers living around Boston will have access to the service. That you? We think you should try it.

6design, user experience, process,

Here’s a step by step process of how I work as an illustrator.
After years of working on an individual sheet of Bristol paper, mistakes and all, I decided to try using transparency sheets for various objects within the illustration. This way I could make adjustments and rescale particular characters or items as I went.
Step 1 - I always begin a new illustration with a miniature thumbnail sketch. More often than not, it’s nearly illegible to anyone besides myself. During this stage I will make about three variations on composition.
Step 2 - After having chosen the thumbnail I liked best/suited the subject matter most, I begin a slightly larger, more legible sketch. This one is about 5inches, so it’s still relatively small and is primarily used to help refine the concept and final composition.
Step 3 - Once all the details are figured out, I move onto Bristol paper ( usually 14x17). Here, I use a blue, architectural pencil to layout the final drawing of the design. This will include all the objects that will appear in the final piece.
Step 4 - After the drawing is finished, I can begin inking, but rather than ink directly on the same piece of Bristol that the drawing’s on, I use separate pieces of vellum; one for each object. For instance, I used one of the tattooed figure, one for his tattoo, and a third for the environment/other figures. This method allows for me make certain scaling and transparency decisions when working digitally. Since each inked layer is scanned separately, I already have segmented layers in Photoshop that I could then apply a mask to or any other alteration.
Step 5 - I simply save one file with all the layers that I can always go back to for easy access and save another with the flattened final image.
ZoomInfo
Here’s a step by step process of how I work as an illustrator.
After years of working on an individual sheet of Bristol paper, mistakes and all, I decided to try using transparency sheets for various objects within the illustration. This way I could make adjustments and rescale particular characters or items as I went.
Step 1 - I always begin a new illustration with a miniature thumbnail sketch. More often than not, it’s nearly illegible to anyone besides myself. During this stage I will make about three variations on composition.
Step 2 - After having chosen the thumbnail I liked best/suited the subject matter most, I begin a slightly larger, more legible sketch. This one is about 5inches, so it’s still relatively small and is primarily used to help refine the concept and final composition.
Step 3 - Once all the details are figured out, I move onto Bristol paper ( usually 14x17). Here, I use a blue, architectural pencil to layout the final drawing of the design. This will include all the objects that will appear in the final piece.
Step 4 - After the drawing is finished, I can begin inking, but rather than ink directly on the same piece of Bristol that the drawing’s on, I use separate pieces of vellum; one for each object. For instance, I used one of the tattooed figure, one for his tattoo, and a third for the environment/other figures. This method allows for me make certain scaling and transparency decisions when working digitally. Since each inked layer is scanned separately, I already have segmented layers in Photoshop that I could then apply a mask to or any other alteration.
Step 5 - I simply save one file with all the layers that I can always go back to for easy access and save another with the flattened final image.
ZoomInfo
Here’s a step by step process of how I work as an illustrator.
After years of working on an individual sheet of Bristol paper, mistakes and all, I decided to try using transparency sheets for various objects within the illustration. This way I could make adjustments and rescale particular characters or items as I went.
Step 1 - I always begin a new illustration with a miniature thumbnail sketch. More often than not, it’s nearly illegible to anyone besides myself. During this stage I will make about three variations on composition.
Step 2 - After having chosen the thumbnail I liked best/suited the subject matter most, I begin a slightly larger, more legible sketch. This one is about 5inches, so it’s still relatively small and is primarily used to help refine the concept and final composition.
Step 3 - Once all the details are figured out, I move onto Bristol paper ( usually 14x17). Here, I use a blue, architectural pencil to layout the final drawing of the design. This will include all the objects that will appear in the final piece.
Step 4 - After the drawing is finished, I can begin inking, but rather than ink directly on the same piece of Bristol that the drawing’s on, I use separate pieces of vellum; one for each object. For instance, I used one of the tattooed figure, one for his tattoo, and a third for the environment/other figures. This method allows for me make certain scaling and transparency decisions when working digitally. Since each inked layer is scanned separately, I already have segmented layers in Photoshop that I could then apply a mask to or any other alteration.
Step 5 - I simply save one file with all the layers that I can always go back to for easy access and save another with the flattened final image.
ZoomInfo
Here’s a step by step process of how I work as an illustrator.
After years of working on an individual sheet of Bristol paper, mistakes and all, I decided to try using transparency sheets for various objects within the illustration. This way I could make adjustments and rescale particular characters or items as I went.
Step 1 - I always begin a new illustration with a miniature thumbnail sketch. More often than not, it’s nearly illegible to anyone besides myself. During this stage I will make about three variations on composition.
Step 2 - After having chosen the thumbnail I liked best/suited the subject matter most, I begin a slightly larger, more legible sketch. This one is about 5inches, so it’s still relatively small and is primarily used to help refine the concept and final composition.
Step 3 - Once all the details are figured out, I move onto Bristol paper ( usually 14x17). Here, I use a blue, architectural pencil to layout the final drawing of the design. This will include all the objects that will appear in the final piece.
Step 4 - After the drawing is finished, I can begin inking, but rather than ink directly on the same piece of Bristol that the drawing’s on, I use separate pieces of vellum; one for each object. For instance, I used one of the tattooed figure, one for his tattoo, and a third for the environment/other figures. This method allows for me make certain scaling and transparency decisions when working digitally. Since each inked layer is scanned separately, I already have segmented layers in Photoshop that I could then apply a mask to or any other alteration.
Step 5 - I simply save one file with all the layers that I can always go back to for easy access and save another with the flattened final image.
ZoomInfo
Here’s a step by step process of how I work as an illustrator.
After years of working on an individual sheet of Bristol paper, mistakes and all, I decided to try using transparency sheets for various objects within the illustration. This way I could make adjustments and rescale particular characters or items as I went.
Step 1 - I always begin a new illustration with a miniature thumbnail sketch. More often than not, it’s nearly illegible to anyone besides myself. During this stage I will make about three variations on composition.
Step 2 - After having chosen the thumbnail I liked best/suited the subject matter most, I begin a slightly larger, more legible sketch. This one is about 5inches, so it’s still relatively small and is primarily used to help refine the concept and final composition.
Step 3 - Once all the details are figured out, I move onto Bristol paper ( usually 14x17). Here, I use a blue, architectural pencil to layout the final drawing of the design. This will include all the objects that will appear in the final piece.
Step 4 - After the drawing is finished, I can begin inking, but rather than ink directly on the same piece of Bristol that the drawing’s on, I use separate pieces of vellum; one for each object. For instance, I used one of the tattooed figure, one for his tattoo, and a third for the environment/other figures. This method allows for me make certain scaling and transparency decisions when working digitally. Since each inked layer is scanned separately, I already have segmented layers in Photoshop that I could then apply a mask to or any other alteration.
Step 5 - I simply save one file with all the layers that I can always go back to for easy access and save another with the flattened final image.
ZoomInfo

Here’s a step by step process of how I work as an illustrator.

After years of working on an individual sheet of Bristol paper, mistakes and all, I decided to try using transparency sheets for various objects within the illustration. This way I could make adjustments and rescale particular characters or items as I went.

Step 1 - I always begin a new illustration with a miniature thumbnail sketch. More often than not, it’s nearly illegible to anyone besides myself. During this stage I will make about three variations on composition.

Step 2 - After having chosen the thumbnail I liked best/suited the subject matter most, I begin a slightly larger, more legible sketch. This one is about 5inches, so it’s still relatively small and is primarily used to help refine the concept and final composition.

Step 3 - Once all the details are figured out, I move onto Bristol paper ( usually 14x17). Here, I use a blue, architectural pencil to layout the final drawing of the design. This will include all the objects that will appear in the final piece.

Step 4 - After the drawing is finished, I can begin inking, but rather than ink directly on the same piece of Bristol that the drawing’s on, I use separate pieces of vellum; one for each object. For instance, I used one of the tattooed figure, one for his tattoo, and a third for the environment/other figures. This method allows for me make certain scaling and transparency decisions when working digitally. Since each inked layer is scanned separately, I already have segmented layers in Photoshop that I could then apply a mask to or any other alteration.

Step 5 - I simply save one file with all the layers that I can always go back to for easy access and save another with the flattened final image.

6illustration, Print, Gallery,

loganfaerber:

In both preparation and promotion for our ( Steve Trevathan and I ) recently established company, “dobot”, we created this poster design that will be distributed as well as sold in our online store, once it’s set up. It also works as a precursor for what is to come from the company. That being said, we are a design company that works to create the best product possible for people and company who are looking to progress, innovate, or in some way improve/contribute to the world. This image represents the closest thing we have to a mascot; a giant robot character we created aptly named, dobot. In a story we’ve conceived (and will ultimately present to the world via animated storybook series on our site) he is a robot who lands on earth and seems to have been programmed to do one simple task; improve the design of everything in order to make it as efficient as possible - a gross exaggeration of our company’s motto. It’s going to be a ton of fun to create and we think that it will be great for our creative juices and personalities to shine through.

-Logan

Source: loganfaerber

Internet Wayfinding

Mark Boulton may be my favorite designer today. In his newly released “A Practical Guide to Designing for the Web”, he explained how he designed a encyclopedia for his thesis. He likened the problems of designing such a monstrous system of way-finding to the convoluted web structures people interact with daily. People don’t read a dictionary cover-to-cover. Instead, they’ll open the book at the center and quickly gather context to navigate from there to something very specific. The destination is in mind before they even pick up the book.

What a comparison!

6user-experience, wayfinding, design,

-